Forum de FilmDeCulte

Le forum cinéma le plus méchant du net...
Nous sommes le 04 Juil 2020, 20:03

Heures au format UTC + 1 heure




Poster un nouveau sujet Répondre au sujet  [ 305 messages ]  Aller à la page Précédente  1 ... 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21  Suivante
Auteur Message
MessagePosté: 09 Oct 2012, 10:02 
Hors ligne
Meilleur Foruméen
Avatar de l’utilisateur

Inscription: 25 Nov 2005, 00:46
Messages: 75523
Localisation: Fortress of Writing
Ca s'arrête plus.

Steven Spielberg delivers his finest work since Minority Report (2002) with his politically charged and emotionally timely film, Lincoln. (...) Tony Kushner adapts the screenplay with clever candor and surprisingly humorous dialogue. Lincoln takes on such a life force of its near two-and-a-half hour runtime but never lets up on its thematic elements or attempts to take the easy route of cheap period satire that wears thin in other films about a dark time in America’s history. The film doesn’t just focus on Lincoln, the political messiah sent to save America from evil, its non-dictum method in retelling a story with so many surrounding characters gives Abe a unique and accessible outlook for a viewer to latch onto, no matter what the viewer may or may not know about him. (...) Spielberg hasn’t been this aware of his abilities as a director since Saving Private Ryan (1998). It’s a huge step back in the right direction. (...) John Williams’ score is subtle, not as contrived as thought from the trailer (...) Janusz Kaminski, one of the best cinematographers working, captures elegant and stunning shots throughout but eventually doesn’t take enough risks with the lens to be considered an achievement. (...) It’s not as good as “Ryan” or “Schindler” but it’s one of his best efforts, period. He’s on his game in a big way. The film is splendid, cinematic magic of the highest degree with screenwriter Tony Kushner as the star of the show. It’s his best theatrical writing effort thus far and a threat in Adapted Screenplay. The last thirty minutes are the best thirty minutes I’ve seen on film this year. Lincoln is a near masterpiece. I can’t imagine a more appropriate way to tell Lincoln’s story than what Spielberg has done here.
http://www.awardscircuit.com/2012/10/08/lincoln-%C2%BD/


Thankfully, we now have a film, courtesy of the legendary Steven Spielberg, that brings the 16th President's amazing uphill battle to cinematic life. The cold hard facts could not be more impressive. For Lincoln, an adaptation of the biography Doris Kearns Goodwin's Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln, Spielberg scales down his usual blockbuster sensibilities (last seen in 2011's World War I melodrama War Horse) to craft an intimate portrait of an iconic political figure. To pull it off, writer Tony Kushner (Munich and the two-part Angels in America) constructs the film like a play, relying on the soothing, chameleon presence of Daniel Day-Lewis to breath life into Lincoln's poetic waxing. The President hits road block after road block on his quest to free the slaves and end the war, Kushner and Spielberg weaving in handfuls of characters to pull him in various directions (and accurately represent the real life events). Each time Day-Lewis' Lincoln gracefully dances the dance, solving every problem with action and words. Today, Lincoln is held in high regard as an inspirational figure. Spielberg shows us why. (...) The story is simple, but Kushner doesn't shy away from laying down lengthy passages of political discussion in order to show the importance of Lincoln's task. (...) The fact-heavy approach takes getting used to, but Spielberg and Kushner adeptly dig deep beyond the political gabfest to find a human side to Lincoln. He's a gentle man, a warm man, and a hilarious man. (...) The drama is iffier: a side story involving Lincoln's son Robert (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) teases an interesting family dynamic that is never fully explored, and is clunky when dropped to the wayside in favor of larger issues. Same goes for Lincoln's wife Mary Todd (Sally Field), who continues to grieve for the couple's lost child. They're important issues, but don't quite work in the fabric of this specific narrative.
http://www.hollywood.com/news/Lincoln_D ... w/41929149


the Spielberg effort showcased the filmmaker's uncharacteristic willingness to recede into the material, resulting in a stagy, hyper-literate drama that begs comparisons to his "Amistad" while towering over it thanks to a handful of measured performances and Tony Kushner's heavy screenplay. There are moments in "Lincoln" when typical Spielberg-grade sentimentalism, from the soundtrack to countless histrionic outbursts, encroach on the story's more subdued qualities. But there's a noticeable consistency to the movie's internal battles; this is, after all, a Civil War tale. (...) Don't trust the trailer. The handful of scenes excerpted in the fleeting teasers released in recent weeks highlight the clumsier scenes involving Lincoln's persistence in passing the 13th Amendment during the tense period when he campaigned for members of Congress to ratify the constitution in early 1864, four months before his assassination. (...) At two hours and 30 minutes or so (no one was quite sure of the runtime beforehand), "Lincoln" contains only a single battle scene in its opening seconds. The rest is pure talk, a keen dramatization of Doris Kearns Goodwin's tome "Team of Rivals," that delivers an overview of Lincoln's crowning achievement in chunks of strategy talk. Ostensibly a well-acted history lesson, it captures the turmoil of the period by observing Lincoln at work rather than wasting time valorizing him.

Unlike John Ford's "Young Mr. Lincoln" or D.W. Griffith's "Abraham Lincoln," Spielberg's focused approach compresses the portrait of an icon into a collection of conversations that oscillate between his professional life and the more uncertain challenges he faced in his relationship with his mentally unstable wife Mary Todd (Sally Field, who lands a handful of frenzied monologues) and his children, including the grown son Robert Todd Lincoln (a barely-seen Joseph Gordon Levitt), whose interest in joining the war gives the president a personal reason to end it. While he's still a dynamic, morally upstanding figure, Day Lewis' Lincoln at least displays a fair amount of conflict. (...) There's not much to "Lincoln" aside from the president and his peers engaging in discourse on the many reasons to abolish slavery. The constant chatter alone makes it stand out in the filmmaker's oeuvre. When I spoke to the director last year, he said he felt no need to remain tethered to large scale storytelling. "If I found a story and felt empowered to want to direct it, and it was just a couple of characters in a room, I would do it," he said. (...) Aided by Kushner's script, "Lincoln" is seriously muted compared to anything Spielberg has done before. "The West Wing" by way of a costume drama, it tracks the abolition of slavery as a series of negotiations with major ramifications only transparently stated in the final scenes. "This is history!" someone actually exclaims. Indeed it is, and with all that talking, "Lincoln" eventually runs out of breath, but not before making it clear that the 65-year-old Spielberg most certainly has not.
http://www.indiewire.com/article/spielb ... he-trailer

_________________
Image


Haut
 Profil  
 
MessagePosté: 09 Oct 2012, 10:02 
Hors ligne
Meilleur Foruméen
Avatar de l’utilisateur

Inscription: 25 Nov 2005, 00:46
Messages: 75523
Localisation: Fortress of Writing
Art Core a écrit:
Ah oui donc c'est vraiment partagé.

Majoritairement positif a priori.

_________________
Image


Haut
 Profil  
 
MessagePosté: 09 Oct 2012, 10:26 
Hors ligne

Inscription: 14 Sep 2012, 10:18
Messages: 6
Pour résumer les réactions : "Don't trust the trailer". Ca a l'air très bien - les seules réactions franchement négatives viennent d'anonymes sur twitter, pas de vrais critiques.


Haut
 Profil  
 
MessagePosté: 09 Oct 2012, 10:44 
Hors ligne
Meilleur Foruméen
Avatar de l’utilisateur

Inscription: 25 Nov 2005, 00:46
Messages: 75523
Localisation: Fortress of Writing
Ce ne sont pas que des anonymes. Ehrlich est critique aussi par exemple.

_________________
Image


Haut
 Profil  
 
MessagePosté: 09 Oct 2012, 10:49 
Hors ligne
Vaut mieux l'avoir en journal
Avatar de l’utilisateur

Inscription: 04 Juil 2005, 15:21
Messages: 18411
Localisation: Paris
Oui mais est-ce qu'il fait partie des personnes qui comptent ?

_________________
La Vie brève de Jan Palach
(192 pages, 16.50€)
Le Dilettante | Place des librairies | Fnac | Amazon


Haut
 Profil  
 
MessagePosté: 09 Oct 2012, 10:52 
Hors ligne
Oberkampf Führer
Avatar de l’utilisateur

Inscription: 04 Juil 2005, 14:38
Messages: 15543
Cosmo a écrit:
Oui mais est-ce qu'il fait partie des personnes qui comptent ?


lol


Haut
 Profil  
 
MessagePosté: 09 Oct 2012, 10:56 
Hors ligne

Inscription: 14 Sep 2012, 10:18
Messages: 6
Ehrlich compte très bien : c'est le critique de boxoffice.com Magazine. J'ai arrête de lire son tweet dès le jeu de mots foireux d'ouverture préparé d'avance : "Abraham Lincoln: Vote Hunter".


Haut
 Profil  
 
MessagePosté: 09 Oct 2012, 11:33 
Hors ligne
Meilleur Foruméen
Avatar de l’utilisateur

Inscription: 25 Nov 2005, 00:46
Messages: 75523
Localisation: Fortress of Writing
Critique (positive mais nuancée) du Guardian :

Politics was a dirty business even in the 19th century, and even when changing history for the better, as the best moments of Lincoln wittily and elegantly prove. (...) But the film is largely too content depicting Abraham Lincoln as an all-knowing icon, and even with Daniel Day-Lewis's beautifully measured (and surprisingly soft-spoken) performance, Lincoln often recedes to the background of the very uneven movie that bears his name. (...) The backroom deals and legal hurdles to make that happen are immensely complicated, but after some bulky exposition this wheeling and dealing among lawmakers makes for the film's strongest scenes. (...) If only modern American politics were remotely as entertaining. (...) Glimpses into Lincoln's personal life, including strained relationships with both his wife (Sally Field) and eldest son (Joseph Gordon-Levitt), are intended to add a human dimension to the president, but they're never as effective as simply seeing the man at work (...) Lincoln isn't as sentimental as you might expect from Spielberg, and though it never digs deep enough into Lincoln as a man, it's unafraid to show him as a canny politician willing to bend the law and make enormous compromises to accomplish a greater goal. With John Williams's gentle score, posh cinematography from Janusz Kaminski and a whole load of big costumes and facial hair for the cast, Lincoln veers too often toward becoming a somnolent period piece, but the strong cast and political texture always manage to perk things back up. Though it might have worked better as a tighter, purely political thriller with even less focus on the title character, Lincoln's smarty-pants pleasures manage to outweigh its stuffy drawbacks.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2012/oct ... -day-lewis

_________________
Image


Haut
 Profil  
 
MessagePosté: 09 Oct 2012, 13:45 
Hors ligne
Robot in Disguise
Avatar de l’utilisateur

Inscription: 13 Juil 2005, 09:00
Messages: 27389
Localisation: Paris
Tous ces avis me donnent vachement envie, le côté politique, méticuleux, fincherien... et aussi le questionnement au centre du film sur l'héroïsme, les valeurs, etc. Trop hâte !

_________________
Liam Engle: réalisateur de comédie, publicité, série, cinéma !
Image


Haut
 Profil  
 
MessagePosté: 09 Oct 2012, 14:06 
Hors ligne
Meilleur Foruméen
Avatar de l’utilisateur

Inscription: 25 Nov 2005, 00:46
Messages: 75523
Localisation: Fortress of Writing
Oui, y a beaucoup de choses qui me rappellent Munich (Spielberg "restrained" à la réa, le scénar bavard et politique de Kushner, l'humanité du protagoniste, la richesse en personnages), il y a des choses qui rassurent (ça ne ressemble pas vraiment à la BA, Williams ne fait pas du War Horse), d'autres qui me font craindre la répétition de certaines erreurs (film inégal, trop long, fin boiteuse), des trucs excitants (les comparaisons avec The West Wing) et des trucs dommages (Joseph Gordon-Levitt/Robert Todd Lincoln sous-exploité).

_________________
Image


Haut
 Profil  
 
MessagePosté: 09 Oct 2012, 14:07 
Hors ligne
Robot in Disguise
Avatar de l’utilisateur

Inscription: 13 Juil 2005, 09:00
Messages: 27389
Localisation: Paris
Oui, le truc sur la fin m'a un peu démoralisé.

_________________
Liam Engle: réalisateur de comédie, publicité, série, cinéma !
Image


Haut
 Profil  
 
MessagePosté: 09 Oct 2012, 14:10 
Hors ligne
Meilleur Foruméen
Avatar de l’utilisateur

Inscription: 25 Nov 2005, 00:46
Messages: 75523
Localisation: Fortress of Writing
Qui-Gon Jinn a écrit:
Oui, le truc sur la fin m'a un peu démoralisé.

C'est encore trop flou (un mec dit qu'il aurait pas fallu montrer la mort tandis qu'un autre dit que c'est les meilleures 30 dernières minutes de l'année) pour que je situe vraiment le problème.

Moi je trouve ça fort au contraire de finir sur l'assassinat de Lincoln, note de désespoir, plutôt que sur la note d'espoir des réussites de Lincoln.

_________________
Image


Haut
 Profil  
 
MessagePosté: 09 Oct 2012, 15:19 
Hors ligne
Meilleur Foruméen
Avatar de l’utilisateur

Inscription: 25 Nov 2005, 00:46
Messages: 75523
Localisation: Fortress of Writing
Tom Silvestro ‏@tomsilvestro

To answer the most important question, Spielberg didn't "Spielberg the ending" w/ mawkishness or an old man looking at a gravestone #Lincoln


:D

_________________
Image


Haut
 Profil  
 
MessagePosté: 09 Oct 2012, 20:19 
Hors ligne
Meilleur Foruméen
Avatar de l’utilisateur

Inscription: 25 Nov 2005, 00:46
Messages: 75523
Localisation: Fortress of Writing
Critique plus partagée de SlashFilm :

Spielberg falters by letting the Sixteenth President remain more myth than man, and the resulting film is a polished period piece that only occasionally feels truly vital.

At its best, Lincoln is nothing short of great. Incredible performances, led by Daniel Day-Lewis as Abraham Lincoln, breathe new life into figures familiar from history textbooks, and a welcome sense of humor punches up the proceedings. But Spielberg never quite manages to help Lincoln down from the pedestal he’s occupied lo these many years, which keeps the character at an emotional distance. In addition, superfluous subplots and dry partisan discussion make some of the setup scenes a bit of a slog to get through.
(...)
Kushner knows how to turn a phrase, and his words are never more enjoyable than when a politician is spitting them at a rival. (Lee Pace tends to be the most frequent receipient of Jones’ vitriol, but many other Democrats get zinged good and hard.) Kushner’s stage roots aren’t always so helpful, however. A well-written monologue is a thing of beauty, but a constant barrage of them yields diminishing returns. The talkiness is particularly problematic in the film’s first half, when we’re still getting to know the many, many characters and sort out which one we need to keep track of for later on.

Spielberg’s most interesting insight in Lincoln has to do with the methods by which the Amendment was passed — which, it turns out, weren’t always on the up-and-up. Politicians then were every bit as petty and partisan as they are today, and the anti-slavery faction in Lincoln is willing to flatter, compromise, bribe, and threaten if that means accomplishing a greater good. It’s a refreshingly honest view of the way deals get made in D.C., one that no doubt still applies today. So it’s a little frustrating that Spielberg never fully engages with the ethical issues that these tactics raise. All of this cajoling is happening with Lincoln’s distant approval, but Lincoln himself is removed from the down-and-dirty bits — a savvy political move, perhaps, but a frustrating narrative one.

Indeed, Lincoln’s biggest flaw is that it fails to shed new light on the American icon. Day-Lewis disappears into another masterful performance, but Spielberg never seems to see the character as a flesh-and-blood man. The movie tries to add a few touches of warmth to Lincoln, notably in his (sometimes annoying) penchant for homespun anecdotes, and he’s allowed to get downright fiery when he’s filled with the righteousness of his cause. But what humanizes a character are flaws and weaknesses, and we see little of that. Had Spielberg allowed Lincoln to be a little more vulnerable, Lincoln might have been a more powerful movie.

_________________
Image


Haut
 Profil  
 
MessagePosté: 17 Oct 2012, 23:09 
Hors ligne
Meilleur Foruméen
Avatar de l’utilisateur

Inscription: 25 Nov 2005, 00:46
Messages: 75523
Localisation: Fortress of Writing
the film pumps with the blood of a nation and one of its darkest chapters. It's Spielberg's most performance-heavy work to date, and indeed, features a cross-section of character actors and star-caliber players all spouting off dialogue thick with the drama of the moment. Every inch of the frame feels heavy with Importance (with a capital "I"), and for good reason. It's a crucial moment and the need to emboss that fact is never lost on Spielberg and screenwriter Tony Kushner.

Speaking of Kushner, there is a nimbleness to the proceedings and it's every bit owed to his stage background. Much of "Lincoln" feels like a play, dramatic exchanges immaculately staged, blocking the actors as crucial to the drama as what they're saying. But his words, and the characters he's molded from history and the work of Doris Kearns Goodwin, also gives the ensemble plenty to play with throughout.
(...)
In many ways, that's the theme of the film. It's a story about manipulation for the good of man and magnanimous politicking. It reveals Lincoln the artist, the politician, and all through a prism of love and consideration for the law.
(...)
I was struck by how judiciously John Williams's original score is implemented throughout. Moments I'd often expect to be slathered with his emotional cues are surprisingly silent
(...)
Janusz Kaminski's photography is also intriguingly reserved. It's still beautiful, mind, and produces countless striking images that are immaculately lit. But the overall look of the film feels less mannered than some of his other collaborations with Spielberg.
(...)
Michael Kahn's film editing is non-intrusive and makes for decent pacing throughout.

_________________
Image


Haut
 Profil  
 
Afficher les messages postés depuis:  Trier par  
Poster un nouveau sujet Répondre au sujet  [ 305 messages ]  Aller à la page Précédente  1 ... 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21  Suivante

Heures au format UTC + 1 heure


Articles en relation
 Sujets   Auteur   Réponses   Vus   Dernier message 
Aucun nouveau message non-lu dans ce sujet. The BFG (Steven Spielberg, 2016)

[ Aller à la pageAller à la page: 1 ... 4, 5, 6 ]

Film Freak

84

6435

01 Juil 2016, 10:54

Prout Man Voir le dernier message

Aucun nouveau message non-lu dans ce sujet. Munich (Steven Spielberg, 2005)

Jack Griffin

13

2750

30 Sep 2005, 13:22

Le Cow-boy Voir le dernier message

Aucun nouveau message non-lu dans ce sujet. War Horse (Steven Spielberg, 2011)

[ Aller à la pageAller à la page: 1 ... 11, 12, 13 ]

Pandi

192

16236

27 Déc 2011, 02:18

David Swinton Voir le dernier message

Aucun nouveau message non-lu dans ce sujet. The Post (Steven Spielberg, 2017)

[ Aller à la pageAller à la page: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ]

Film Freak

74

5316

28 Nov 2017, 23:28

Film Freak Voir le dernier message

Aucun nouveau message non-lu dans ce sujet. Indiana Jones 4 (Steven Spielberg, 2008)

[ Aller à la pageAller à la page: 1 ... 129, 130, 131 ]

Film Freak

1963

68047

20 Aoû 2010, 17:14

Film Freak Voir le dernier message

Aucun nouveau message non-lu dans ce sujet. Indiana Jones 5 (Steven Spielberg, 2021)

[ Aller à la pageAller à la page: 1 ... 15, 16, 17 ]

Karloff

253

18180

17 Mar 2020, 20:51

Le Cow-boy Voir le dernier message

Aucun nouveau message non-lu dans ce sujet. Bridge of Spies (Steven Spielberg, 2015)

[ Aller à la pageAller à la page: 1 ... 5, 6, 7 ]

Film Freak

101

7190

05 Oct 2015, 07:22

Tetsuo Voir le dernier message

Aucun nouveau message non-lu dans ce sujet. Ready Player One (Steven Spielberg, 2018)

[ Aller à la pageAller à la page: 1 ... 14, 15, 16 ]

Film Freak

236

21675

28 Mar 2018, 02:48

Erik Vonk Voir le dernier message

Aucun nouveau message non-lu dans ce sujet. Tintin (Steven Spielberg, Peter Jackson, 2011)

[ Aller à la pageAller à la page: 1 ... 124, 125, 126 ]

thesquale

1875

84095

06 Oct 2018, 08:44

Arnotte Voir le dernier message

Aucun nouveau message non-lu dans ce sujet. The Kidnapping of Edgardo Mortara (Steven Spielberg, 2017)

[ Aller à la pageAller à la page: 1, 2, 3 ]

Film Freak

43

4474

26 Fév 2020, 22:07

Film Freak Voir le dernier message

 


Qui est en ligne

Utilisateurs parcourant ce forum: Aucun utilisateur enregistré et 11 invités


Vous ne pouvez pas poster de nouveaux sujets
Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets
Vous ne pouvez pas éditer vos messages
Vous ne pouvez pas supprimer vos messages

Rechercher:
Aller à:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
Traduction par: phpBB-fr.com
phpBB SEO
Hébergement mutualisé : Avenue Du Web